How to cope with an intimidating boss

18-Jul-2017 07:31 by 3 Comments

How to cope with an intimidating boss

Do not use any specific names or places if you are concerned for your privacy.

'All I could think was: 'Wow — she's young.''But when she offered me the job, I was excited. Unfairly or not, this is the less-than-flattering reputation many have acquired in the workplace.

Examples include accidents, natural disasters, assault, attempted murder and rape because these are considered to be of short duration.

However, the trauma related to workplace bullying is not an isolated, short-term event.

They are under the influence of their abuser and unable to get out of the situation they are in.

Examples include: Some psychologists believe that a different term, Complex PTSD (C-PTSD), should be used to identify trauma that is repeated or long-term.

According to the Workplace Bullying Institute, "workplace bullying is repeated, health-harming mistreatment that takes one or more of the following forms: verbal abuse; offensive conduct/behaviors (including nonverbal) which are threatening, humiliating, or intimidating; and work interference (sabotage) which prevents work from getting done." Workplace bullying has devastating effects on the targeted individual.

Not only does one feel that their job is in jeopardy, they may also start to feel physically ill and emotionally harmed.

There may be complete changes to one's concept of who they are and in their ability to cope with stressful situations.

During long-term traumas, people are held in physical and/or emotional captivity.

I thought working for someone so youthful would be a positive challenge.'Yet, within five months, Alexandra's hopes that her new young boss would provide a 'positive challenge' had morphed into dread at the prospect of sitting desk-to-desk with her every day.'Her know-it-all attitude was intimidating,' she says. But what's it like as a middle-aged employee having a millennial boss?

'I felt so drained that I quit.'Much has been made of the hazards of employing millennials — the generation born between 19, with many now in their 20s and early 30s. If you haven't given the idea much thought, then perhaps it's time to start.

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